Castles monuments in Lincolnshire
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Castles & Ancient Monuments in Lincolnshire

Heritage sites also including Battlefield sites, Historic Landmarks & Roman Forts in Lincolnshire...





Lincolnshire Ancient Monuments, Castles, Roman Forts, Battlefield Sites, etc

 
blank tabLINCOLN CASTLECastles & Historic Monuments
Castle Hill, Lincoln, LN1 3AA
Photo of LINCOLN CASTLE
Discover the new-look Lincoln Castle, home to one of the four surviving Magna Cartas in the world; the famous attraction has just undergone a £22m refurbishment. One thousand years of history brought to life - right where it happened.

Highlights include: the David PJ Ross Magna Carta vault, a new home for the historic document in its 800th anniversary. A complete-circuit Medieval Wall Walk offering spectacular views of the city, audio guide for all ages, and the newly-refurbished Victorian Prison. New shop and café.

Group discount available (includes free tickets for leaders and coach drivers). Exclusive guided tours of the inner bailey can be arranged alongside our regular set tours. So whether you're a history buff or just looking for a fun family day out, Lincoln Castle's the place to be.
Tel: 01522 554559
E-mail: lincoln_castle@lincolnshire.gov.uk
Book online or find more info - LINCOLN CASTLE

blank tabTATTERSHALL CASTLECastles & Historic Monuments
Sleaford Road, Tattershall, Lincoln, LN4 4LR


National Trust Property. A vast fortified and moated red-brick tower, built in medieval times for Ralph Cromwell, Lord Treasurer of England. The building was rescued from becoming derelict by Lord Curzon 1911-14 and contains four great chambers with enormous Gothic fireplaces, tapestries and brick vaulting. There are spectacular views from the battlements and a guardhouse with museum room. No wheelchair access to the upper floor.

Bolingbroke Castle

Bolingbroke Castle Photo © Snidge
Bolingbroke Castle -
Photo: Snidge CCL

 

Bolingbroke Castle can be found eleven miles north-east of Tattershall in the Royal village of Old Bolingbroke.


Originally just "Bolingbroke," it was later given the "Old" prefix to distinguish it from "New" Bolingbroke, a village built by local landowner John Parkinson in the early 19th century as part of a threefold ambition to sink a coalmine, to build a "city" and to plant a forest. More... 

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Belvoir Castle

Belvoir, Grantham, Lincolnshire, NG32 1PE
Tel: 01476 871002    Fax: 01476 871018
E-mail: info@belvoircastle.com

The first Belvoir Castle was built by William the Conqueror's standard bearer in the 11th century. Home to the Duke of Rutland, the Castle enjoys breathtaking views and houses an impressive collection of period furniture and porcelain, together with paintings by Gainsborough, Reynolds, Holbein and Poussin. Extensive grounds include the Spring Gardens, dating from the 1800s, recently restored by the Duchess of Rutland and now open for pre-booked groups.

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Sibsey Trader Mill

Sibsey, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 6HB
Tel: 01205 750036     E-mail: traderwindmill@sibsey.fsnet.co.uk

This stately brick-built tower mill on the edge of the Fens is one of the few surviving six-sailed windmills in England. It was one of the last mills to be built in Lincolnshire, erected only in 1877, but stands on the site of a much earlier post mill. The original machinery at Sibsey was still working in 1953, and the mill has since been restored. It contains a display about Lincolnshire mills.

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Heckington Windmill

Hale Rd, Heckington, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34 9JW
Tel: 01529 461919     E-mail: jrobmac@hotmail.com

Heckington's unique eight-sailed windmill is a landmark in the surrounding Fens. Built in 1830, it was given its eight sails in 1892, after the previous sails were blown off in a thunderstorm. The mill stopped work in 1946, but after extensive restoration by the County Council and the Friends of Heckington Mill, it opened once more for work in 1986. The turning sails can still be seen when the wind is right, and the Mill is open at selected times throughout the year.

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